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A while back I wrote a blog post suggesting that datacenter infrastructure would move from an on-premise operation to the cloud. It may have seemed counter-intuitive that the infrastructure itself would become available from the cloud, but that’s exactly what’s happening.

We’ve now seen everything from security to system management to storage evolve into as-a-service datacenter offerings, yielding all the benefits of SaaS — rapid innovation, pay-as-you-go, no hardware installation — while at the same time providing rich enterprise functionality.

As the datacenter gets dis-intermediated with the as-a-service paradigm, an interesting opportunity exists for the “big data” layer to move to the cloud. While big data is one of the newer parts of the infrastructure stack — and should have been architected and delivered as a service from the start — an estimated 90+% of Fortune 2000 companies carry out their big data analytics on-premise.  These on-premise deployments are complex, hard to implement, and have already become something of a boat anchor when it comes to attempts to speed up big data analytics. They perfectly define the term “big drag.”

Without question the time has come to move big data to the cloud and deliver this part of the infrastructure stack as a service. Enter Cazena — our latest investment in the big data sector. The Cazena founders were former leaders at Netezza, the big data appliance leader that went public and was acquired by IBM for $1.7 billion. Prat Moghe, founder & CEO of Cazena, previously led strategy, product and marketing at Netezza. Prat has teamed up with Jit Saxena, co-founder of Netezza, and Jim Baum, the CEO of Netezza — all leaders in the big data industry.

This team knows a great deal about big data and agility of deployment. Ten years ago (long before the term big data was being used), the Netezza team came up with a radically simple big data appliance. Appliances reduced the sheer complexity of data warehouse projects — the amount of time and resources it took to deploy and implement big data.

In the next decade, even faster deployment cycles will be required as businesses want data on-demand. Additionally, the consumption pattern has changed as the newer data stack built using Hadoop and Spark has broadened the use of data. A new cloud-based, service-oriented deployment model will be required. The Cazena team is uniquely positioned to make this a reality.

We could not be more thrilled to be backing the team that has the domain expertise and thought leadership to change the face of big data deployments. Big data is changing the way the world processes information, and Cazena is uniquely positioned to accelerate these efforts.

The mobile revolution has spread beyond the mini supercomputers in our hands all the way to the datacenter.

With our expanded use of smartphones comes increased pressure on servers to help drive these devices: The activity we see everyday on our phones is a mere pinhole view into all that’s happening behind the scenes, in the massive cloud infrastructure powering all those apps, photo-shares, messages, notifications, tweets, emails, and more. Add in the billions of devices coming online through the Internet of Things — which scales through number of new endpoints, not just number of users — and you begin to see why the old model of datacenters built around PCs is outdated. We need more power. And our old models for datacenters are simply not enough.

That’s where mobile isn’t just pressuring, but actually changing the shape of the datacenter — displacing incumbents and creating new opportunities for startups along the way. READ MORE

The last few years have seen the incredible growth of cloud computing. Applications and services that were developed for on-premise use have all found a new home in the cloud. As with most technology transformations, early adoption often occurs around a hobbyist developer community that then expands into more mainstream adoption and use. The cloud is no exception; as it grows it continues to empower developers to shape technology and change the world.

What started as a primitive, manual, and cumbersome infrastructure service, has evolved into a variety of cloud vendors offering vast collections of services targeted at a number of different audiences –perhaps too vast. We have Database-as-a-Service, Compute-as-a-Service, Analytics-as-a-Service, Storage-as-a-Service, as well as deployment and network environments, and everything in between. It has left the developer community with more options, functionality, and cost than it needs or wants.

It’s time for the cloud to once again focus on developers, and that is where DigitalOcean comes in.

Started by Ben Uretsky and his brother Moisey, with the additional intellectual brawn of an eclectic group of passionate developers, DigitalOcean has focused on one goal: making developers lives easier by providing a powerful, yet simple Infrastructure-as-a-Service.

SOURCE: Netcraft

The DigitalOcean service is purpose-built for the developer, offering automated web infrastructure for deploying web-based applications. The results have been eye-popping. From a standing-start in December 2012, DigitalOcean has grown from 100 web-facing computers to over 50,000 today, making it one of the fastest growing cloud computing providers in the world. It is now the ninth largest web infrastructure provider on the planet. With this round of funding, the management team intends to aggressively hire more in-house and remote software engineers to accelerate that already tremendous momentum.

SOURCE: Netcraft

DigitalOcean is also taking a page out of the open source world and is using and contributing to the most relevant open source projects. In the same way that Github or Facebook or Twitter offers open source as a service, DigitalOcean does the same. A few weeks back, I wrote a post presenting several viable models for open source deployments and DigitalOcean is a case study. We are thrilled to be working with the DigitalOcean team as they continue to build a cloud that developers love.

NOTE: Chart data from Netcraft.