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A while back I wrote a blog post suggesting that datacenter infrastructure would move from an on-premise operation to the cloud. It may have seemed counter-intuitive that the infrastructure itself would become available from the cloud, but that’s exactly what’s happening.

We’ve now seen everything from security to system management to storage evolve into as-a-service datacenter offerings, yielding all the benefits of SaaS — rapid innovation, pay-as-you-go, no hardware installation — while at the same time providing rich enterprise functionality.

As the datacenter gets dis-intermediated with the as-a-service paradigm, an interesting opportunity exists for the “big data” layer to move to the cloud. While big data is one of the newer parts of the infrastructure stack — and should have been architected and delivered as a service from the start — an estimated 90+% of Fortune 2000 companies carry out their big data analytics on-premise.  These on-premise deployments are complex, hard to implement, and have already become something of a boat anchor when it comes to attempts to speed up big data analytics. They perfectly define the term “big drag.”

Without question the time has come to move big data to the cloud and deliver this part of the infrastructure stack as a service. Enter Cazena — our latest investment in the big data sector. The Cazena founders were former leaders at Netezza, the big data appliance leader that went public and was acquired by IBM for $1.7 billion. Prat Moghe, founder & CEO of Cazena, previously led strategy, product and marketing at Netezza. Prat has teamed up with Jit Saxena, co-founder of Netezza, and Jim Baum, the CEO of Netezza — all leaders in the big data industry.

This team knows a great deal about big data and agility of deployment. Ten years ago (long before the term big data was being used), the Netezza team came up with a radically simple big data appliance. Appliances reduced the sheer complexity of data warehouse projects — the amount of time and resources it took to deploy and implement big data.

In the next decade, even faster deployment cycles will be required as businesses want data on-demand. Additionally, the consumption pattern has changed as the newer data stack built using Hadoop and Spark has broadened the use of data. A new cloud-based, service-oriented deployment model will be required. The Cazena team is uniquely positioned to make this a reality.

We could not be more thrilled to be backing the team that has the domain expertise and thought leadership to change the face of big data deployments. Big data is changing the way the world processes information, and Cazena is uniquely positioned to accelerate these efforts.

A new architectural era in computing is upon us, and the datacenter is changing to accommodate it. The cloud generation of companies has ramped their dominance and proven their models, and the legacy enterprise is close behind in making this massive shift. These new datacenters—as pioneered and designed by Facebook, Google, and Twitter—are defined by hyper-scale deployments of thousands of servers, requiring a new software architecture to manage and aggregate these systems. Mesosphere is that software, and we believe this architecture will be as disruptive to the datacenter as Linux and virtualization have been over the past decade.

Today’s application architectures and big data workloads are scale-out, stateless, and built to leverage the seemingly infinite processing capacity of the modern datacenters. These modern hyper-scale datacenters are the equivalent of giant supercomputers: they run massively parallel applications that serve millions of user requests a second. We are moving from a collection of servers running discrete, stateful applications, to massive scale-out applications that treat the hardware as one giant server.

In that “giant server” view of the world, Mesosphere is the obvious foundation for this new cloud stack and adoption is scaling fast. Look under the datacenter hood in many forward-looking, hyper-scale environments, including Twitter, Airbnb, eBay, and OpenTable, and you will find Mesosphere.

The Future of the Datacenter is Aggregation (not Virtualizaton)

Ten years ago, virtual machines (VMs) revolutionized the datacenter. This was because while the servers were getting bigger and bigger, the apps running on them pretty much stayed the same size. In order to make better use of those large servers, it made sense to virtualize the machines so that you could run multiple applications on the same machine at the same time.

Today, aggregation is fomenting a similar revolution and applications don’t fit on single machines anymore. In today’s world, applications run at a much larger scale (millions of users, billions of data points, and in real-time) and they are essentially large-scale distributed systems, composed of dozens (or even thousands) of services running across all the machines (virtual and physical) in the datacenter. In this world, you want to stitch together all of the resources on those machines into one common pool from which all the applications and services can draw.

Aggregation has proven itself in the A-lists of hyperscale companies, like Google and Twitter. They’ve demonstrated that it’s much more efficient to aggregate machines—pooling all of the resources—and then build applications against the datacenter behaving as a single machine.

Aggregation, and the tools to manage it at scale, is what Mesosphere is bringing to everybody —and it’s what we believe the future of the datacenter looks like.

The companies that buy into this architecture do not abandon virtualization, containers, or other approaches. These become important infrastructure components. But the way they manage their entire datacenter will evolve beyond the duct tape and band aid, highly manual approach to scripting IT operations tasks and “recipes”, and configuring dependencies each time a new application is brought online or a server goes down.

Mesos: From UC Berkeley to Reality

In 2009, Mesosphere Co-founder Florian Leibert was working at Twitter to scale the application in response to its exponential growth. At the time, he spotted a new open source technology that had been built at UC Berkeley called Mesos and he helped Twitter bring it into full production.

Today, almost all of Twitter’s infrastructure is built on top of Mesos, which is now an Apache open source project and is at the core of Mesosphere’s products. The Mesosphere stack, which includes Apache Mesos, is not a hypothetical technology. It’s highly mature and battle-tested, in large-scale production, running in both private datacenters and in public cloud environments. Other organizations using Mesos include: Hubspot, Airbnb, Atlassian, eBay, OpenTable, PayPal, Shopify, and Netflix.

Mesosphere is harnessing the core open source technology of Apache Mesos, and making it possible for everyone to tap into its power. By building an entire ecosystem around Mesos, they are making it easy to install, operate, and manage. For developers, Mesosphere provides simple command-line and API access to compute clusters for deploying and scaling applications, without relying on IT operations. For IT operations, Mesos abstracts the most difficult low-level tasks related to deploying and managing services, virtual machines, and containers in scale-out cloud and datacenter environments, and provides true automation, fault tolerance, and server utilization for modern scale requirements. Finally, Mesos allows applications to move between different environments without any change to the application.

Mesosphere will help define the next generation datacenter. I am honored to be joining the board of a team of dedicated system-level software engineers who will change the face of enterprise computing.